IST 2008 1
IST2008
Christianities in Antiquity (to 600 CE) Christianities in Antiquity (to 600 CE)
M 08:30AM–Noon
4 cr.
Micah Saxton

Adv. Req.: Xties in Antiquity
Crs. Dates: Mar 25–May 31, 2019
Credits: 4
Room: Bacon 212
An introduction to the social, institutional, and intellectual history of Christianity in Europe from the beginnings through the century following the fall of the Western Roman Empire. Topics include: context and origins, structures of worship and ministry in the early church, persecution and martyrdom, early Christian thought and Greek philosophy, unity and diversity in early Christianity, orthodoxy and heresy, the rise of Constantine the Great, the Arian controversy and the Council of Nicea, early ascetic movements, and the theology of Augustine.

IST 2510 1
CTINTRO
Introduction to Theology Introduction to Theology
T 08:30AM–Noon
4 cr.
Jeremy Garber

Adv. Req.: Intro to Theology
Crs. Dates: Mar 25–May 31, 2019
Credits: 4
Room: Iliff Hall 301
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the goals, tasks, and basic content of Christian theology. In particular we will look at systematic theology, what it is, why it is important, how it works, and historical resources from the Christian tradition that are relevant to many vocations today.

IST 4002 1
INTRN3
Internship Seminar Internship Seminar
W 08:30–11:00AM
4 cr.
Arthur Porter

Adv. Req.: Internship phase 3
Crs. Dates: Mar 25–May 31, 2019
Credits: 4
Room: Iliff Hall 204
Prereqs: Internship Sem.
The purpose of this course is to further professional formation through critical reflection on and consultation about your internship experience with peers and faculty within the seminar setting and course assignments. As a requirement of the MDiv and MASJE degrees, students complete a 420-hour Internship and concurrent 30-week Internship Seminar during the Fall, Winter, and Spring quarters of one academic year. All three quarters must be completed in sequence within a single academic year. Internship Seminars are offered in residential and hybrid-online formats, and meet weekly for 2.5 hours or its equivalency for three consecutive quarters. 4 credits/quarter totaling 12 credits. IST 4000 offered in fall, IST 4001 offered in winter, IST 4002 offered in spring.

IST 4002 3
INTRN3
Internship Seminar Internship Seminar
W 08:30–11:00AM
4 cr.
Val Jackson

Adv. Req.: Internship phase 3
Crs. Dates: Mar 25–May 31, 2019
Credits: 4
Room: Bacon 212
Prereqs: Internship Sem.
The purpose of this course is to further professional formation through critical reflection on and consultation about your internship experience with peers and faculty within the seminar setting and course assignments. As a requirement of the MDiv and MASJE degrees, students complete a 420-hour Internship and concurrent 30-week Internship Seminar during the Fall, Winter, and Spring quarters of one academic year. All three quarters must be completed in sequence within a single academic year. Internship Seminars are offered in residential and hybrid-online formats, and meet weekly for 2.5 hours or its equivalency for three consecutive quarters. 4 credits/quarter totaling 12 credits. IST 4000 offered in fall, IST 4001 offered in winter, IST 4002 offered in spring.

IST 2134 1
SJESEM
SJE Sem: The House That Justice Built SJE Sem: The House That Justice Built
R 08:30AM–Noon
4 cr.
Jennifer Leath

Adv. Req.: Soc Just & Eth Seminars
Crs. Dates: Mar 25–May 31, 2019
Credits: 4
Room: Bacon 212
Mapping the points of origin and trajectories of justice in generally and in the United States, in particular, is one of the most significant and sacred tasks of religious and social ethics. Methodologically, on one hand, this course focuses on the work of Gary Dorrien and Michael Sandel cartographers of justice ethics and theories of justice in the U.S. On the other hand, this course emphasizes the life, experiences, and moral constellations of and about Afro-Diasporic people and communities in the United States, noting that Afro-Diasporic people remain among the most religious of any demographic group in the U.S. This course provides a survey of Afro-Diasporic religion through the lens of “prophetic” religious traditions. Alongside theories of justice emerging from the works of thinkers as diverse as Maria Stewart and Cheikh Anta Diop, Richard Niebuhr and Iris Marion Young, Sandel and Lorde, Dorrien and Townes, historians of religion frame the course's central concern with the evolution of justice in theory and praxis in the U.S., preparing class participants to define, explore, and critique the role of the “justice” in both Afro-Diasporic and broader U.S. religious tradition. Specifically, this course will consider implicit and explicit ethical mandates for religion qua pursuits of justice. Through this course, students will learn who has framed justice discourse within the U.S., how this work has been done, and the unique impact by and on the particular demographic of Afro-Diasporic people in the U.S.
Find out more about Jennifer Leath.

IST 2235 2
RECITAL
Master s Recital Master s Recital
Click for details
0 cr.
Ted Vial

Adv. Req.: Master's Recital
Meet. Dates: Tue, Apr 09, 10:00AM–Noon
Credits: 0
Room: Iliff Hall 202
The masters recital allows graduating students in the professional masters’ degrees to reflect upon and synthesize the learning that they have experienced throughout their degree program. Engagement with concrete situations, such as case studies and current events, will provide opportunities to connect classroom learning to professional settings. Students will also have the opportunity to name their vocational hopes and directions with their peers and faculty, and participate in other communal conversation and celebration as their degree draws to a close. This is a requirement for graduation for all graduates, as it serves as the primary means for gathering learning outcomes assessment data for our accrediting body.
Find out more about Ted Vial.

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